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NOW WHAT?My scheduleMy therapy
  • Being diagnosed with a chronic illness can always cause an unpleasant surprise. Depending on the seriousness of the condition,  our everyday life is upset in different ways. Suddenly there are burning questions. Why me? How am I going to break this to my family?

    We are in need for deeper answers, often existential, and experience a wide range of emotions. A small setback becomes an overbearing problem. Nevertheless, a smile can present us with a ray of sunlight.

    Over time, things get back in place. We get back our beloved routine with a hint of adjustment in these new circumstances. Still denial lingers in the back of our head. Sometimes it makes us see false hope. I'm cured! I don't need drugs anymore! I was probably misdiagnosed!

    We should not rush into decisions when it comes to health and not make decisions on our own.

    No one knows better than my doctor….that's the mantra we have to repeat.

    Bellow you will find some of the challenges faced by many patients in their effort to adhere to their prescribed medication and adapt to new lifestyles. Are there any statements that you identify with?

    1. "I forget to take my medications"
    2. "I do not know why I have to take some of my medications"
    3. "Sometimes I feel discomfort when I take my medications"
    4. "I take too many medications and I find it difficult to remember how to take them correctly (specified times, administration method etc.)"
    5. "I have trouble taking my medication in the prescribed way"
    6. "I do not believe I suffer from any illness"
    7. "The medication I take is too expensive"
    8. "I stopped taking my medications on my own volition because they were
    9.   ineffective"
    10. "I stopped taking my medications on my own volition when I started feeling better"
    11. "I did not visit my doctor in time to renew my prescription"
    12. "I am forced to deal with delays in the prescription and supply of my
    13.   medication"

     

  • Coming up with a schedule that fits our individual tasks and needs is the most crucial part in getting better. This way, we can get the best out of our medicine and organize efficiently our daily life.

    It would be helpful to talk with your doctor, so you can adjust the time of treatment according to your personal schedule and daily routine. You might also find it helpful to use reminder services, such as reminder phone calls or text messages. Other ways include marking the dates and times you have to take your medication on a calendar displayed in a prominent spot (for instance, on the refrigerator door) and the use of a pill organizer.

    It would be helpful to talk with your doctor, so you can adjust the time of treatment according to your personal schedule and daily routine. You might also find it helpful to use reminder services, such as reminder phone calls or text messages. Other ways include marking the dates and times you have to take your medication on a calendar displayed in a prominent spot (for instance, on the refrigerator door) and the use of a pill organizer.

    Patients might stop taking their medication when they have used it all up and forget, neglect or delay renewing their prescription. This affects treatment effectiveness and, by extension, the course of the illness. Scheduling prescriptions may help you receive your medication timely and continue treatment without interruptions.

    Outside factors, such as medication prescription and delivery procedures can disrupt smooth treatment adherence. Ahead-of-time planning might help you receive your medication timely and continue treatment without interruptions.

  • Following doctor's advice and changes in lifestyle can prove tricky than you thought at first. Sometimes we face doubt and other times obstacles get in the way.

    When you are not entirely sure of what to do, keep in mind these simple rules

    It would be helpful to discuss with your doctor why and how your prescribed medication helps with your medical condition. You should also exchange information and opinions in order to come up with an appropriate treatment plan together.

    Side effects might understandably discourage you from taking your medication. It is always best to consult your doctor and find ways to handle this issue together. Side effects often last for a short time and then fully subside. In some cases, your doctor might suggest a reduction in dosage or a change in the medication to minimize or eliminate side effects. Your doctor might also suggest a different medication that could nullify the side effects of the original drug and/or offer practical advice on reducing the severity of your discomfort from those side effects.

    Some medication might require more complicated administration methods than others (for instance, through injection). Talk with your doctor about possible alternatives. You may find it easy to seek in-home support services. This kind of service may provide you with the necessary training for using a medication so that you can later do it on your own, or may consistently facilitate administering the medication when it is not possible to do it by yourself.

    In the case of certain asymptomatic illnesses, patients do not follow their prescribed treatment because they do not experience any discomfort or effects on their daily functioning and they reason that there is no significant benefit from taking their medication. Even when it comes to illnesses with severe symptoms, patients may not recognize the necessity of receiving treatment and any accompanying benefits, resulting in a failure to follow their prescribed medication. You should talk with your doctor about your health and the benefits of your treatment, and exchange information and opinions in order to come up with the appropriate treatment plan together.

    Communicate to your doctor any financial difficulties related to your treatment in order to examine any possible alternatives.

    When you do not feel immediate relief or improvement in your symptoms you might give up on your medication before allowing it enough time to take effect. It is important to continue treatment until the medication starts to show beneficial effects. Talk to your doctor about the time your medication needs to start taking effect.

    Patients often stop taking their medication on their own volition when they start feeling better and see an improvement in their symptoms, believing they no longer need it. This may then lead to symptom recurrence, either immediately or after a period of time passes. Your doctor should fill you in on the complications that can arise from interrupting your treatment and the necessity in continuing it.

Question1: Do you know the names of all the drugs you have to take?
Question 2: Do you know the reason you have to take each of the drugs prescribed?
Question 3: Are you familiar with the way you have to take your medication?
Question 4: Do you believe you need all the drugs prescribed to you?
Question 5: Have you ever been careless with the time you have to take your medication?
Question 6: Do you ever forget to take your prescribed medication?
Question 7: Do you sometimes stop taking your drugs when you start feeling better?
Question 8: Do you sometimes stop taking your drugs if they make you feel worse?
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